Scripting Archive

Review: Windows PowerShell 2.0 Best Practices – Introduction

    A while back I received a review copy of Windows PowerShell 2.0 Best Practices by Ed Wilson (blog | twitter) and the Windows PowerShell Teams at Microsoft. Having finally found the time to sit down

Powershell – Comparison Operators

I’m writing this one so I remember these operators. Powershell doesn’t use standard operators such as =, <, , !=, etc. These operators are used in the following manner. Operator Conventional Operator -eq = -ne or !=

Powershell – Quite note on Objects

I’m sure this comes as no surprise to anyone who’s dabbled in Powershell, but just about everything in Powershell has an Object underneath. The results we see on screen come from those objects and it’s only when

Powershell – Piping

One of the most often-used features I’ve seen so far in Powershell has been the concept of piping the results of commands into other commands to ultimately return something formatted, limited, or otherwise morphed into the desired

Powershell – Arrays & Hash Tables

I don’t have too much to say about Arrays at this point, but as I’m partly blogging this for my own education, I’ll put down what I’m learning.  At this point, I’m expecting the arrays to be

Powershell – Variables

I’ve just started to play around with variables in Powershell. I used them a little bit before this, but am in the process of figuring out basic commands around variables. First thing to note is that variables

Powershell – Modules and Profiles

Probably not technically correct, but pretty close. I’ve been trying to use SQLPSX for Powershell, recently updated to v2.0. For the longest time, I’ve tried various methods to import the modules and couldn’t get them to import

Getting Started with Powershell

I’m in the process of learning PowerShell. This seems to be the first scripting language that we can use at the server/desktop level that has some serious backing from Microsoft. I remember VBScript, CScript, Batch files, and